Gymnast Sets Guiness Record

Humans do unbelievable things, and gymnast Ashley Watson has just set a record for this amazing high horizontal bar move. Here is his statement on Instagram: ashwatson92 My official Guinness World Records attempt! ‘The farthest backflip between horizontal bars’ 5.87m! #OfficiallyAmazing

The distance between the two bars is 19.3 feet. If you go to Watson’s Instagram page, you will see various videos of this 26 year old performing in World Championship competitions but also missing the mark in goofy, stunt practice attempts, like the one below.

Career Highlights: 2009 Australian Youth Olympic all around champion, 2014 British Championships high bar champion, 2015 British Championships parallel bars champion. Ashley has long been a member of the British Squad and was an extremely successful junior, back in 2009 taking the Australian Youth Olympic title. Despite suffering years of injury, Ashley continues to be an important member of the GB elite squad and is known for his work especially on parallel bars and high bar.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BocBSfKjGTI/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet

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James Corden Joins Mark Wahlberg’s Daily Workout

This is a humorous video of James Corden working out with Mark Wahlberg. But it’s at 4 am!!! Mark has an insane daily schedule:

Wahlberg’s typical daily schedule:
2:30 a.m. wake up
2:45 a.m. prayer time
3:15 a.m. breakfast
3:40-5:15 a.m. workout
5:30 a.m. post-workout meal
6 a.m. shower
7:30 a.m. golf
8 a.m. snack
9:30 a.m. cryo chamber recovery
10:30 a.m. snack
11 a.m. family time/meetings/work calls
1 p.m. lunch
2 p.m. meetings/work calls
3 p.m. pick up kids from school
3:30 p.m. snack
4 p.m. workout No. 2
5 p.m. shower
5:30 p.m. dinner/family time
7:30 p.m. bedtime

Is this what it takes to be a success? If so, no wonder that so few people achieve Mark’s pinnacle of fitness. Here is another link to learn more about Mark’s lifestyle.

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If You Want to Do 100 Push Ups a Day…

I dreamt for a long time about doing 100 push ups non stop. Never realized that goal. But the headline for this video caught my eye, and I was glad to learn that these guys think it’s better to do sets and not every day. Not sure they are authorities, but they help me rationalize a bit.

Since tearing my shoulder overdoing exercise in November 2017, I haven’t done many push ups. My physical therapist was totally against it. But after a year, I am feeling better and putting a little more stress on my shoulder. Hopefully I can get back to my previous capability.

Over 2500 Days In A Row Of Exercise

Yesterday was the 2,506th day in a row that I have spent five minutes or more doing some kind of exercise. And I do not count the hours of tennis or squash, which sometimes occur 3-4 times a week and can add up to 7-plus hours a week of vigorous activity. Almost seven years, never missing a day. I did something on trips to Mongolia, Easter Island, Japan. I rose out of bed, when I remembered that I had forgotten. I even exercised the other day after 1:00 AM.

A terrific achievement for me, because I was so lazy in my previous life, going months without doing anything. I stopped going to the gym after a futile attempt. I wouldn’t pick up weights that were in my office. I was hopeless.

Then one day, ashamed and disgusted, I challenged myself to do anything for at least five minutes, whether rowing on a machine, push ups, pec flys, stretches, planks. Sometimes I was active for 15-20 minutes.

Last November I overdid a machine in a hotel gym and messed up my left shoulder. That forced me to do physical therapy to gradually recover. Couldn’t push a seat belt down or take off a t-shirt without pain. But the PT and other exercises have made a difference. Am back up to a 3-minute plank (record is 5 minutes) and pec flys with 10-pounds (used to use 25-pound weights). It’s all a process, a slow slog…for someone who used to be a slug. No more. 2500 days in a row, without missing one of them…

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Age Is Just A Number

A friend thinks I could dance like this with or without my grandchildren. I wish I agreed with him. Maybe I COULD learn this routine if I tried…

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Unimaginable Unbelievable Athletic Accomplishments

The People are Awesome series shows amazing physical stunts. Mind-boggling. Check out its website.

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Juggling 14 Balls At Once!

Very impressive. My record is three, which I did in a high school play.

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Ping Pong Kids

mini ping pong

I was teaching my seven-year-old grandson how to play ping pong using a mini version of small paddles and teeny tiny net. Lots of fun. A few days later, I sent him some videos of kids practicing the game in Asia. I wish I could hit as well and consistently as these children…

Life Is Very Competitive and Not Fair

Baby Pull Up

This photo by Stanley Kubrick symbolizes a lot for me. It reminds me that no matter what my goals and dreams are, there will be others who have been working on similar dreams for years more than I have. They may have had privileges, parents and mentors who prodded them and supported them, while I had none of those advantages.

Like this child of a bodybuilder, they may have genes that suit their ambitions. You can see it so often: the painter whose parents were visual artists, the dancer whose parent was also a dancer, the musician who springs from a line of talented musicians, etc. Whereas their brains or bodies are inherently suited for success in a certain pursuit, the rest of us are swimming upstream…if we can even swim at all.

The challenge is to find some realm, any area, of individual experience that one can excel in. And practice and train there without fail or discouragement. No matter how much of a head start others have who will attempt to defeat you, you must find the will to test them and possibly win the contest.

I may admire and envy this infant who is already on the way to some kind of success. But that is no excuse for giving up, regardless of when I start training and before I even enter the competition.

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Jason Brown Knocks Us Out

Never heard of Jason Brown until I read this article.

The writing by Patricia Lockwood is a bit over the top, but it sure expresses enthusiasm that’s rare:

Suddenly, here come the goose bumps. The elasticity of his Russian splits belongs to ballet; his flexibility is less like rubber bands than ribbons. His spins are so beautiful that they look as if they might at any moment exit his body completely and go floating off like the flowers in “Fantasia.” And running alongside the joy is something grave, which seems to me to be respect for the gift.

The audience begins to clap as well as its overwhelming Caucasity will allow. “He’s got ’em,” the longtime commentator and Olympic gold medalist Scott Hamilton exclaims as the fiddle picks up. At other points, onlookers burst into the spontaneous laughter of babies. I love that laughter. It happens when the viewers overlap so completely with the athlete, with one another, that they don’t know where their own bodies end anymore. We watch sports for these moments. They’re why, every two years, the planet stops spinning and everyone turns their eyes to the spectacle of the Olympics.

This ice skater is extraordinary. He is exciting and memorable. Goose bumps.

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The Great Islay Swim

Chad gets a drink

You never really “know” people or what they are thinking. So it’s easy to be amazed, when you find out new facts about someone.

I was blown away the other day after finally reaching Chad Anderson. My calls for a week were not returned, and I hoped this new business acquaintance was okay. He calmly informed me that he had been unable to call back, because he was swimming around the wild coast of the Isle of Islay, one of the Inner Hebrides islands of western Scotland. This was a 100 kilometer swim (62 miles), and it took him and two other adventurers seven days to become the first hardy guys to achieve this distinction.

I have spent two weeks myself in the Outer Hebrides islands, and visited Scotland a number of times. So I can easily imagine how rough those seas and shores are. Plus the weather isn’t ever sunny like a Caribbean paradise. Islay has the Atlantic Ocean to its west and is as far north as Newfoundland. It’s often cold, windy and rainy. This swim sounds daunting.

Battling the Waves

If you check out some of the videos on this facebook link, you will be blown away (literally) by what you see and hear.

There is also an article that describes benefits to a local charity. There are eight whiskey distilleries on the island, and as the swimmers passed nearby, each distillery contributed some spirits to a single oak cask that will marry the blend for months until it’s bottled and sold. Some of the proceeds will go to the Royal National Lifeboat Institute.

Fighting all the way

The photos give you a sense of the challenges faced and overcome: rain, 35 mph winds, 12 foot waves. I am awed…but now read this post from the fb page:

Ok stage 5 was a 4 hr gamble, the forecast for tomorrow was not good at all 35 mph westerly left the north stage of the journey (a key part) not being possible, BUT there was a wee wee window of 4 hrs late this afternoon, yes a big gamble but the boys agreed to give it a go with the help of Peter and Steve in the canoe and Harold on the boat. The guys set off south of Nave island, and as the weather had it, we had a weather window. the swell was 12 ft the tide 2 knots with the wind and tide going the same way, the boys nailed it. I must admit I have the utmost respect for all 3 of them. they are true athletes and have earned the respect of doing this challenge. A cracking day and well done lads.

Islay shore

Three badass swimmers lagoon relaxing after the second day at sea

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Extreme Treadmill Exercise Styles

This guy has a goal to reach a running speed of 24 mph. For months, he has been consistently training to reach his goal. He slowly walked up the top of the treadmill and began running as fast as he could reaching 23.5 mph. He didn’t quite reach his goal leaving him frustrated but he was a step closer.

This man has a different take on extreme exercise: relax…life is short…

WHICH ONE DO YOU PREFER?

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Humbled Again

I have been playing a lot of tennis…for ME. During the summer, I was on the court 4-5 times a week. Sometimes twice in one day. That’s doubles, two hours at a time…so 8-10 hours.

Then I learned that one of the men I play with had a week of 14 matches, two times each day…a total of 25 hours. I think he is around my age. What a guy.

Don’t think I will ever play that much this time around. Now if I come back as a super jock…

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2017 Extreme Sports Compilation

We have seen some of these video shots before. But there are some breathtaking clips that are not common, from around 4:14 to 5:36 that I found scary and incomprehensible. Clearly these are NOT ordinary people. I really can’t relate to their mentality.

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I Have A Trick

Here is a clever solution to improving at sports that I believe is transferable to all of one’s life. I complained to Greg Reiss about my weak tennis backhand. Greg coaches squash and tennis at Millbrook School in upstate New York.

When we met for a lesson, he said that he had a trick for dealing with my problem. Instead of focusing on the poor backhand, he would work on my much stronger forehand. He told me to move a step to the left, when I was receiving serves, so that I could have more chances of using my forehand. He said to give up on a hard topspin backhand, which I couldn’t do, and only hit a backhand lob, which I could do. He said to focus on my strengths, instead of debilitating attempts to master a stroke that continued to elude me.

And it worked. I felt better about my game, odds of winning points, self confidence. Maybe if I weren’t so old and coming so late to the game, Greg would have given me different suggestions. But this was sound advice at my stage of learning.

Clearly this can be applied to everyday life. You just have to know what your strengths and weaknesses are. You might have to accept that you are good at speaking, but not at fixing car engines. You need to know yourself and pursue those paths that mesh with your skills.

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Would You Jump From 33 Feet Or Chicken Out?

Would you jump?

https://www.nytimes.com/video/opinion/100000004882589/ten-meter-tower.html

This psychological experiment shows people confronting their fears of height and injury. Paid just $30 to participate, only 30% of the 67 subjects chickened out. Amazing to me that so many actually jumped. Very amusing to watch scared people reason with themselves out loud and make their eventual choices. What would you do?

Growing up in Florida and working at hotels during high school, I was proficient at diving off a three-meter board (10 feet) and doing somersaults and other tricks. I can’t recall if I ever jumped from a higher platform. I did parachute jump out of airplanes at 1250 feet in the army, when I was 21. Not sure what I would do today. Below is the NY Times article that explains all.

Our objective in making this film was something of a psychology experiment: We sought to capture people facing a difficult situation, to make a portrait of humans in doubt. We’ve all seen actors playing doubt in fiction films, but we have few true images of the feeling in documentaries. To make them, we decided to put people in a situation powerful enough not to need any classic narrative framework. A high dive seemed like the perfect scenario.

Through an online advertisement, we found 67 people who had never been on a 10-meter (about 33 feet) diving tower before, and had never jumped from that high. We paid each of them the equivalent of about $30 to participate — which meant climbing up to the diving board and walking to its edge. We were as interested in the people who decided to climb back down as the ones jumping.

We filmed it all with six cameras and several microphones. It was important for us not to conceal the fact that this was an arranged situation, and thus we chose to show the microphones within the frame. Ultimately, about 70 percent of those who climbed did jump. We noticed that the presence of the camera as well as the social pressure (from those awaiting their turn beside the pool) pushed some of the participants to jump, which made their behavior even more interesting.

In our films, which we often call studies, we want to portray human behavior, rather than tell our own stories about it. We hope the result is a series of meaningful references, in the form of moving images. “Ten Meter Tower” may take place in Sweden, but we think it elucidates something essentially human, that transcends culture and origins. Overcoming our most cautious impulses with bravery unites all humankind. It’s something that has shaped us through the ages.

‘Ten Meter Tower’ appeared at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. It is part of a series produced by independent filmmakers who have received support from the nonprofit Sundance Institute.

Maximilien Van Aertryck and Axel Danielson are documentary filmmakers based in Gothenburg, Sweden, who have worked together since 2013.

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2016 GoPro Best Extreme Sports Clips Compilation

Made it to the local ski slopes this month for the first time in three years. I was never a natural growing up in Florida, so it was a treat to watch my 27-year-old daughter and my 6-year-old grandson learn to snowboard. I stuck to skis. So beautiful to watch the fluid motion across snow. And then I bumped into this GoPro video of all kinds of sports in addition to those on snow. Magnificent. It does make me wish I were younger and could easily learn how to do some of these without big body risk.

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Humans Are Amazing

I am awed…by the talent above and the unusual tennis serve techniques below:

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Backwards Running?

This video shows Aaron Yoder setting a Guiness World Record for running the mile backwards! He did it in just under six minutes. Aaron explains the sport and how he got into it here . Below are some excerpts from his article.

…running backward is just fun. One of the biggest rushes I’ve ever gotten in life is when I’m running backward in complete darkness and going downhill. Your awareness is so high because you can’t see a thing.

I’ve been running — first forward, now backward — my whole life…I didn’t slow down until I’d been working at Bethany College as a track coach for seven years. It got to the point where my knees felt like they were grinding whenever I ran. Three years ago, my doctor told me, “You should never run again.” While I ignored him, I was in a lot of pain and started to wonder, What am I gaining from this?

That’s when I had an epiphany. It was as if a voice said to me, “Just turn it around and make good of the bad.” I decided then and there that I was only gonna run backward for six weeks, and see how it went.

I didn’t change anything else about my training — just the direction I faced. I’d do a speed day. I’d do a hill day. I’d do a tempo day. I’d do a distance day. I’d do an acceleration day. All backward. After six weeks, my body and mind felt so much better.

A few months later, I traveled to Essen, Germany, for the International Retro Running World Championship, the Olympics of backward running. I’d never raced backward around a track before, but I quickly discovered that it’s the opposite of racing forward in some ways. When you’re running forward it’s an advantage to be right behind the leader so you know when to start making your move — because if you’re out in front you don’t know where everyone’s at. But in backward running, the best position to be in is the front. That way you can see where everyone is. The sprints, though, can be difficult because you’ve gotta worry about staying in your lane, which is hard when you’re going around turns.

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Surfcasting In Nantucket

I caught one!

I caught one!

We spent a week in Nantucket in early October. Not too many folks around then, and I finally realized my dream of having a go at surfcasting. The first afternoon attempt was a complete bust. The inn provided an experienced guide at no cost who let the air out of his tires to 15 pounds and drove us on the sand. Nada for two hours. But I never give up.

Two days later I tried again, and this time I hooked five and landed three. Of course I wanted to eat them, but Captain Rob preferred to throw them back. It was very exciting to reel them in with the cold water crashing around and the nearby seals waiting to steal my hooked fish. I’m not much of a fishing enthusiast, but this was definitely a thrill.

And I didn’t mind at all that my guide knew where and when to go, what kind of pole and lure. I felt very satisfied and proud.

not too crowded

not too crowded

When I was actively turkey hunting with a shotgun, I use to make fun of those who hired a guide to take the hunters to exactly the right place, do the calling, bring the bird into easy shotgun range and then pat the client on the back when it was time to take a shot. I was doing everything myself: the scouting, locating the roosts, knowing when to arrive in position, calling after watching videos and hearing the hens in the woods. A long and challenging process.

But a few-days-a-year visitor to the ocean or the woods is handicapped. Can’t learn all it takes. Guides are good. I accept my limitations and have more respect for my colleagues from out of state. It was great fun, and much better when I caught fish, even if I had Captain Rob’s help.

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Danny Macaskill Cycles Through Spectacular Scotland

His trick biking moves are always a delight to watch and admire. But the video above is truly extra-ordinary–for the danger and the scenery. Over 45 million youtube views.

I am especially appreciative having recently borrowed a 3-speed bike in Nantucket and struggled unhappily against the slight inclines and the brisk 17-mph winds. My puny 13-mile, 3-hour trip was a major effort that took all my fortitude NOT to hitch a ride back from friends in a car who offered. And I was really shamed by a buddy who received my whining texts and wrote back unsympathetically, “Gosh Ira, you just rode a bike, not trek to the North Pole.”

Here is another, more recent Macaskill video. I have more of them on this site.

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Some Of These Tricks May Be Real!

Even if this is all doctored, which I don’t think is the case, these stunts are very entertaining…amazing what people can do…even if it took them hundreds of tries to succeed!

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The Older You Are, The Happier You Become

old people are happier

old people are happier

This article summarizes research claiming old people are happier than young people. No concrete explanations why…just some guesses:

Despite our culture’s obsession with youth, it turns out that the 20s and 30s are generally a very stressful time for many young adults who are plagued by anxiety and depression…They noted that there are many pressures unique to this life phase including establishing a career, finding a life partner and navigating financial issues.

But what makes it so amusing to me are the following facts about the people sampled:

Participants were contacted via landline, meaning the experiences of people who have only cellphones were not included in the results.

In addition, people were excluded from taking part in the survey if they had dementia, lived in a nursing home or had a terminal illness. That means the elderly participants were, on the whole, fairly healthy, which might influence their sense of well-being.

Finally, everyone involved in the survey lived in sunny San Diego. It is possible that aging in Michigan could be very different than aging in Southern California.

The study had major implications, especially considering that within just a few years, more people on the planet will be over 60 than under 15.

Here are some more excerpts:

Yes, your physical health is likely to decline as you age. And unfortunately, your cognitive abilities like learning new skills and remembering things is likely to suffer too.

But despite such downsides, research suggests that your overall mental health, including your mood, your sense of well-being and your ability to handle stress, just keeps improving right up until the very end of life. Consider it something to look forward to.

In a recent survey of more than 1,500 San Diego residents aged 21 to 99, researchers report that people in their 20s were the most stressed out and depressed, while those in their 90s were the most content.

The older people were, the happier they felt…“People who were in older life were happier, more satisfied, less depressed, had less anxiety and less perceived stress than younger respondents.”

People’s goals and reasoning change as they come to appreciate their mortality and recognize that their time on Earth is finite.

“When people face endings they tend to shift from goals about exploration and expanding horizons to ones about savoring relationships and focusing on meaningful activities. When you focus on emotionally meaningful goals, life gets better, you feel better, and the negative emotions become less frequent and more fleeting when they occur.”

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Deshun Wang’s Inspirational Outlook

Hahaha. This 80-year-old has a terrific, upbeat attitude about how to live a life. Check out his “Hot Grandpa” modeling moves in the first 30 seconds of the video below.

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Rafaela Silva Rises From Slum To Olympics Gold

Perhaps you have heard of Rafaela…she just won the women’s gold medal in Judo. Her rise is a great achievement worth appreciating, and this 2014 video spells it out beautifully.

Her story is outstanding: raised in the City of God favela (shanty town or slum), she played and fought in the streets. She was always in trouble. But at age eight, her father took her to a local judo academy, and her coach saw her talent and cultivated it. He said she was used to seeing crime, drug dealers, dead bodies. She knew that the struggle in the dojo (training gym) was nothing compared to that.

She became so good that she competed in the 2012 Olympics in London. But she was disqualified there for using a leg move that had recently been declared illegal. She almost considered quitting judo after that…and the racist words hurled at her. But her judo friends and coaches supported her and encouraged her to stay with it…then she became the world champion in 2013 and the Olympic champion in 2016.

Lots of young people want to follow her and be like her. Silva tells them to be themselves and follow their own dream. Good advice.

Another great part of this story involves the gym she went to that was founded in 2003 by Flavio Canto, who won a bronze medal in men’s judo at the 2004 Olympics. He was a Brazilian who had grown up partly in England and the US and saw the extremes of rich and poor in Rio and wanted to do something about it. So he offered free judo classes to kids from the favelas. He saw that the discipline and achievements in the dojo led to improved performance, values and attitudes in all the rest of the kids’ lives. In school and at home, judo’s teachings of bravery, determination and humility were transforming the kids. They were improving and bettering themselves. Canto’s dojos are in five different favelas catering to around 1000 students.

“In life we always seek for an activity that makes you complete. Until then my life was all about judo and the Olympic dream. When the Instituto Reação came into my life I found a new way, which made me feel accomplished. This social project prepared me to leave the competition behind. In my last years as an athlete I no longer felt so motivating to have results and winning medals. I knew within me was born a desire to do more important and relevant things,” said Flávio.

“When this project started I began to live the reality of the slums and that shocked me a lot. I realized that there were generations getting lost to violence, in the drug dealing war. It was common to see young boys of all ages carrying weapons very close to our academy here in Rocinha. I still wasn’t sure if my intention of bringing sport and education (literacy) closer to these kids could work,” he explains.

There is no doubt about it now. He certainly has made a difference way beyond discovering and training an Olympics gold medalist.

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