Archive for July, 2009

Here’s How Chris Ivey Trained To Do 103 Pushups in 2 Minutes To Earn First Place in His Navy Boot Camp Competition

After graduating high school in 2005, I gave college one semester and withdrew to join the Armed Forces. I had wanted to join the military since my early teens for personal satisfaction and to continue our family tradition. I went to a recruiting office and met with recruiters for the Marines and Navy. My mother begged me not to become a Marine, because of their tip-of-the-spear philosophy in war. Between how she felt and the encouragement of my cousin, who would end up enlisting with me, I ended up choosing to be a sailor instead of a soldier. It was mid-January ’06 when I signed my contract to leave for boot camp in early March; it gave me 2 1/2 months for training.

Chris Ivey showing his stuff—Spring 2009

Chris Ivey showing his stuff—Spring 2009

In high school I was active, athletic and weight-lifted frequently. However, since graduation I had rarely worked out. This meant I was going to start from scratch to become boot-camp ready. My plan of attack was to stick strictly to calisthenics; more specifically, running, pull-ups, sit-ups, push-ups and dips. The high frequency and lightweight exercises were going to keep me lean, strong and quick. Perfect for the functional strength I would need. Also, at 6’2 and 180 lbs, I was not trying to lose any weight. In fact, I was trying to gain 5-10 lbs.

I joined the local gym, even though I did not use the machines, and found a secluded corner to do my push-ups in. I had a basic principle to my workouts: max out every day. Where as some may say to themselves, “I have to only do 100 push-ups before I can get out of here today,” I never put limitations on my exercises and would just do as many reps as possible in my gym session. I started off by doing as many sets of 30 push-ups as I could. In the first several days of working out, my sets were adding up to between 90 and 120 push-ups. I was also doing sit-ups, pull-ups and chin-ups at this time. Sit-ups were between 100 and 150—a 100 set and a 50 set. I would rotate my pull-ups and chin-ups between wide-grip to normal chin-ups and normal pull-ups; all in sets of 10. They were adding up to 30-40 overall reps. After my routine I would run a mile on the treadmill to cool down.

Chris Ivey in boot camp—2006

Chris Ivey in boot camp—2006

The first two weeks were pretty brutal. I was working out 4-5 times a week and was constantly sore, but by the second week I was seeing gains. The lightweight and high repetition workouts were great for definition, which was becoming evident. Gaining weight was not happening easily, but I was at least maintaining well. I kept at my simple routine and philosophy of maxing out.

After the second week, reps increased rapidly across the board. By my fifth week I was up to 400-600 push-ups in a session. The reps had slightly evolved: I would warm up with sets of 50 until I had finished 150 total. I was rotating my push-ups between close-grip, normal and wide-grip. My pull-ups and chin-ups were totaling 90 and 120. Sit-ups were ranging from 200 to 300. In terms of running, my least favorite activity, I was still doing between just one and two miles for my cool down. It was around this time that I hit a plateau, and increases in reps became pretty much non-existent. By now I also had gained 5 lbs.

Before I knew it, I was catching a plane with my cousin—we ended up going through boot camp together—and two other local recruits to Great Lakes, Illinois for Navy boot camp. I was very fit by now, but still a little anxious about what was to come. After arriving, we were put into divisions. My division was #151, comprised of 40 girls and 40 guys. We also had a brother division with the same proportions of girls and guys. We split the bunkroom with the guys from the other division and did nearly everything together. Read the rest of this entry »

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Terrible Tennis And My Glass Is Half Empty

OK there is a Life Lesson to be learned in my tennis playing of the last 10 days. I can’t wait to benefit from it.

Basically I have been losing consistently, and with four different partners, so I can’t blame it on the other guy. There have been four days of playing plus two practice sessions, almost 12 hours on the court, and I can’t seem to do what I need to: make winners rather than unforced errors—I hit the ball long, and I can’t fall on it with my body the way I want to for extra power. I also find it difficult to keep watching the ball until it hits my racket—I look away just before impact to see where the ball is headed.

Lost all of the regular doubles games, a couple of singles games, and four out of five matches in a 4 ½ hour tournament with the age 50’s set (including three of those in tiebreakers). I am very frustrated, cursing out loud, grumpy, angry and real, real pissed at myself. Even though I was complimented by a couple of guys much better than I am who hadn’t seen me play in a while and couldn’t believe how much I had improved.

Not sure how to overcome this setback. Read the rest of this entry »

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And Even More Gym Records—701 Ball Crunches And 10+10 Pull Ups+Chin Ups

For the 9th time in a month, I exercised, 8 of the times in a gym. I had mentioned that I did 500 crunches and was told about a guy who does 1000. So I went to beat my record and did 150+150+200 crunches with legs on exercise ball and back on floor (60 seconds in between sets) and then a two minute break followed by 201 crunches—could have done more— with back on floor and smaller ball between knees in the air. I’m not rising up much, but I am tensing the abs, which are growing. This total for the ball is 701, compared to the earlier record on July 21st of 360!

After that record, I did a few machines and went to the chin up bar, where I bested my previous record of 10 pull ups + 8 chin ups by doing 10+10. Felt great.

Don’t know where this strength is coming from. Maybe it is inspired by the Chris Ivey push up story that I just received…

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More Gym Records—500 Crunches and 11 Chin Ups

Went to the gym today–the 7th time in the month–and there was another exercise hour at home. So I might make 9 sessions this month! Set two new records today: did 300 bicycle crunches–this was three sets of 100 each (up from 290 in four sets!). Then I did 200 crunches using the exercise ball for my legs with back on the floor (up from 150).

After that, another record, sort of: did 11 chin ups followed in five minutes by just 6 pull ups. Previous record is 10+8…maybe it still stands if I look at the totals. But 11 is 10% better than 10, and I am a bit closer to my goal of 25. Sure have to gut out the last two.

Not pleased with the minimal growth of my lats. May have to change the routine more. But the abs are appearing. One gym rat said he sees his abs best when brushing his teeth. Maybe that is where I take the next photo.

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Peter Houldin Tells How He Lost 130 Pounds and Became a Marathon Runner!

I’LL START WITH A CONCLUSION: DIETS ALONE DO NOT WORK. YOU HAVE TO EAT PROPERLY AND EXERCISE REGULARLY. YOU HAVE TO ADOPT A DIFFERENT LIFESTYE.

HERE’S MY STORY:

Peter Houldin in 2008

Peter Houldin in 2008

Growing up, I always carried a few extra pounds, but never considered myself obese. In high school, I played football, basketball, and golf and was in decent enough shape.

Not until I reached college did the weight start pouring on. In the fall of 1992, I entered my freshman year of college and probably weighed 210 pounds and wore a 38-waist pant. I had a large frame and am six feet tall, so wasn’t overly worried. Certainly didn’t feel fat.

Over the next few years—probably due to too little exercise and too much cafeteria food, pizza, and cheap beer—the weight slowly–ok quickly–started to pile on. By junior year, I weighed 284 pounds and was squeezing into a 44 pant. I had gained 74 pounds in 2½ years!

Peter Houldin in 1994 at 284 pounds

Peter Houldin in 1994 at 284 pounds


Peter Houldin in 1990's before weight loss

Peter Houldin in 1990's before weight loss

While I was having a great time putting on the weight and playing collegiate golf, my studies took a back seat. Over the holiday break of my junior term, I received a letter from the academic dean suggesting I stay home for a semester and prove that I wanted to be in his school.

As it turns out, that was one of the better letters I ever received. I took it as a challenge. I enrolled in a local state college and spent the spring semester working hard at both school and on my weight. Not only did I excel in school, but by the summer, I had dropped a ton of weight.

To be honest, the first pounds were the easiest ones to lose. Given I had put the weight on so quickly, fortunately, it came off equally as quick. That’s not to say I wasn’t diligent about it. I took stock of the habits that caused the weight gain, namely, fast food, pizza, beer, and zero exercises. I decided to do just the opposite. I began a cardio regimen and went back to the basics with regards to food. I ate very boring and plain foods – turkey, mustard, and whole wheat sandwiches. Chicken and veggies for dinner, and eliminated alcohol and snacks.

When I returned to my original school the following fall, I had taken off 60 pounds. Read the rest of this entry »

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Easy Way To Make A Six-Pack

Here’s a good idea that shortcuts the path to my goal:

How to make a six-pack FAST!

How to make a six-pack FAST!

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Terrific Ceiling Mural For Smokers

smoking in your grave

smoking in your grave

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Tour de France Very Exciting

Been watching many of the finishes and latter parts of the races, and I am addicted. It’s on live in the morning and then re-broadcast two or three times each day on Versus. Thrilling to view, and I am not even a cyclist. But when Lance (in #2 position overall) attacked back yesterday and caught up to the leader, Contador, so that he did not lose any more time, it was exhilarating. As are many of the other finishes, climbs and various chases. Have you seen any of this? Check it out…

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Tennis Report

Hit with Frank Adams on July 20 who pointed out lots of mistakes in my strokes. I have to fall on the ball, so that my body weight adds to the power, and my arm does not do most of the work—my elbow is starting to hurt from the stress.

Frank also told me how to gain power in my serve: start with my foot parallel to the base line (rather than at a 45 degree angle) and then rotate my body clockwise as much as I can, so that my back is more towards the net. This twisting/coiling is like a spring that gets unwound and generates way more force to the ball. It sure did work! Even had a lot of spin. Can’t wait to practice it and use it in a game.

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Exercise Report—More New Records

July 17th—Some exercises at home…core roller, bent over rows, and 10+6 chin ups+pull ups

July 18th—Set a bicycle crunch record: 100+60+70+60=290+150 ball crunches (up from 280 bicycles +100 ball crunches). Did set chin up+pull up record of 10+8, up from 10+6½.

July 21st—New exercise-ball crunch record of 160+60+140=360 (up from 350). Lots of pain, and the abs were really popping. A big achievement, given I didn’t want to go to the gym, though I went at 8:30 pm, very reluctantly, lots of procrastination, was tired, but was inspired by Charlie Narwold’s urging to make the abs burn. Only 10+6 chins+pulls. But I was also able to hold Supermans on the ball for 60 seconds—both left and right hands. That is a long way from trying to do it for 2 seconds. And I did those AFTER the crunches. I love the progress.

July 22nd—Went to the gym yet again and did 11+8 pull ups+chin ups…another new record. Also heavier dumbbells for bent over rows. And 1 1/2 hours of racketball, my third time ever, including a hard lesson from an experienced player who mentored me.

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David Is To Be Returned To Italy

A bit of cultural news for a welcome change:

 Michelangelo's  David

Michelangelo's David

After a two-year loan to the United States,
Michelangelo’s David is being returned to Italy . . .

Ooops, look what happened in just two years

Ooops, look what happened in just two years

His Proud Sponsors were:

American Adults Getting Fatter

TWO-THIRDS OF AMERICAN ADULTS ARE EITHER OBESE OR OVERWEIGHT, AS DEFINED BY THEIR BODY MASS INDEX OR BMI.

CHICAGO (Reuters) – Obesity rates continued to climb in the past year with 23 U.S. states reporting adults in their states are fatter now than they were a year ago, two advocacy groups said on Wednesday.

Obesity rates did not decrease in a single state last year, and the groups warned that the U.S. obesity epidemic must be addressed as lawmakers reform the nation’s health system…

Being overweight or obese raises the risk of heart disease, diabetes, some cancers, arthritis and other conditions… Read the rest of this entry »

Tennis Report—New Grip And New Strategies

Playing the game furiously and practicing as well with a ball machine. So I was on the court five times (7 3/4 hours) last week and three times (5½ hours) this week. Was also in Newport RI watching a tennis tournament for three days last week.

My performance is mixed. Won three out of four doubles sets one day, lost to the oldest guys (they are 93 and 85) the next (one a tiebreaker). Then won at singles with a friend who has a great top spin stroke, and he suggested I change my grip—I moved my hand half an inch farther from the racket head, so that the end of the handle is in my palm rather than just past it. Now I can whip the racket more. What a difference. I can now hit the sweet spot of the racket much more often, almost every time. But the extra power sends the ball long a lot, and we lost all three sets one day.

However my team finally beat the oldest guys 6-2. This is the first time in 8 sets. A record. However pathetic. So some improvement. Then last night I played with the stronger guys in their 50’s and received compliments from two men who had played singles against me just once a year ago and were never available again—I was too far beneath their level. One was on the opposing doubles team, and I couldn’t believe how easily I returned his serve last night that I could hardly touch a year ago. Unfortunately my serve was off, and I choked in the final game. My team split sets.

One player last night uses what he calls “junk” shots—they are all spins and lobs and drops and dinks. He doesn’t do the hard power hitting that so many others choose. Joe’s game is very thoughtful, filled with well-placed shots. Much like the 2007 and 2008 champion of the Campbell’s Cup tournament I saw in Newport, Fabrice Santoro, nicknamed The Magician. Joe admires Santoro’s style, so I called him the Sorcerer’s Apprentice.

Joe was full of advice that I liked: Read the rest of this entry »

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Some Advice For Gaining Weight And Mastering the Universe

At the hotel gym in Newport, a very big older man—maybe 230-250 and in his 70’s—came in from the pool area wearing a white bathrobe and raised a few small dumbbells. He saw me pumping iron in my tank top and said I looked fit and like I had lost weight. When I told him that I wanted to gain weight, he immediately told me how to do it: “Macademia Nuts,” he blurted effortlessly. I had the feeling he spoke from long experience.

It was also like a scene out of the movie, The Graduate, when Dustin Hoffman’s character came out of the swimming pool wearing a face mask with snorkel tube and had the word “Plastics” whispered into his ear by a family friend who was giving him the secret of the universe and where the future was for a young man seeking his fortune.

It was life imitating art for me…Plastics…Macademia Nuts. Aha. I understand it all now, says Grasshopper.

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Exercise Report—Shirking Visits But Setting Records

Falling behind schedule these last days—only going to the gym once a week. And not working at home. Uh oh. Not a good sign. Only excuse is lots of tennis, four days out of town, and some tiredness from changed diet due to taking doxycline to fight Lyme’s disease.

But I did set some crunch records each time:

On July 10th I did 85+60+75+60=280 bicycle crunches followed by 100 ball crunches. Previous record was 250 bicycles in 4 sets. Then only 8 pull ups + 7 chin ups (record is 10+6½).

On July 14th, I did 150+100+100=350 ball crunches (record was 300), supermans on the ball that lasted 15 seconds some times, and only 7 pull ups + 6 chin ups. Not too bad, considering that I played tennis in the morning.

Today I never made it to the gym, but I did do 9 chin ups followed within a minute by 6 (or 7) pull ups. And the 45-lb dumbbells felt a bit light for bent over rows.

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Bill Ale’s Running and Cycling Story: There Are No Short Cuts, And One Can Achieve Almost Anything With Commitment and Hard Work

Bill Ale (L) and friend cycling in the Italian Alps—9/08

Bill Ale (L) and friend cycling in the Italian Alps—9/08

Hard work and commitment is the key to any athletic endeavor! Only a very small percentage of athletes have that genetic gift that seems to allow them to excel with minimal work. Most of us have to accept what we were given at birth and sculpt that into whatever athletic objective we may want to pursue or achieve. I am a perfect example of the latter guy.


I am a 58 year old, retired male and have been involved in competitive sport my entire life. I was not given the perfect body, but what I was given was heart. I learned that even though I did not have all the tools, I still could achieve anything if I committed myself to it and worked hard enough. 


After I got out of college, for the first time in my life, I had no sport, and much to my surprise I began to notice my pants more snug and my mid section starting to expand. So I began to jog, which I really didn’t care for, but I stayed with it. One day, while in the men’s room at Southern Connecticut State University, where I was attending graduate school, a frail looking gentleman approached me after noticing my running shoes and asked me if I was a runner. I sheepishly said, I was. He introduced himself and said he was also a runner. In fact, he said he was a marathoner. I was intrigued, as I had read some of Bill Roger’s books on marathon training.

48 Switchbacks of the Stelvio Pass in Italy—One of Bill Ale's best rides on a bike—9/08

48 Switchbacks of the Stelvio Pass in Italy—One of Bill Ale's best rides on a bike—9/08


Make a long story short, we set a date to “run” together. Our running date was a torture fest for me as I tried my best to keep up with him for the 5 miles we ran. After the run he offered me some constructive tips and wrote down a basic training schedule for me. I followed that schedule and soon began to see improvements. As the old adage goes “the better you are the better it gets”. I was hooked. I set my sights on running the Manchester Thanksgiving Day Road Race with my new running friend.

On the big day, which happened to be my first race, I had no clue where to line up for the start. So I lined up next to my friend, which happened to be in the second row right behind Amby Burfoot, Bill Rogers and Frank Shorter. The gun sounded and we were off. Mile one, I passed at a 5:10 pace. Mile 2, I was in a survival shuffle and by mile 3, I was walking. A harsh reality! I learned alot that day, mostly that positive outcomes are a product of commitment and hard work. Something I had not done. There are no short cuts.


One year after that memorable day and many miles I ran my first marathon in 3 hours and 55 minutes. Over the next two years, I joined a running club, trained hard and managed to lower my marathon time to just under 3 hours. Lots of 80 mile weeks . I did manage to get a PR of 2:53 in New York, but shortly after that I injured my knee, which ended my running career. Read the rest of this entry »

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Federer Plays Chess on the Tennis Court

He just won Wimbledon and the most Grand Slam titles of any player ever. He may be the greatest player ever. How is he so good?

A coach of 50 years, Frank Adams (who’s ideas and videos are on this site) said that Roger has better instinct and intuition than his competitors.

Writer Cynthia Gorney said “…Federer — who usually has uncanny on-court telepathy about what his opponent plans for three shots hence and exactly how to wreck it…”
(From a June 21, 2009 New York Times Magazine article by her about Rafael Nadal.)

Looking ahead reflectively at chess moves is essential to be a champion. But to do it as well on a tennis court? I have enough trouble anticipating just the next shot coming back at me. How does a pro predict three shots ahead? Let’s see, if I hit here, then he will hit there, then I will hit there and he will hit here…all in fractions of a second. I suspect his brain and reflexes work faster than most humans, so that he has more time to react and plan. Plus he has superb—actually the most superior—handling and placement skills. The tennis announcers are always saying he has great hands, great feel.

There are men I play with who claim they can look at the angle of the server’s racket and anticipate which side of the serving box the ball will go to. I can’t. Some of the other guys don’t believe the first guy can actually do that. Can you?

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Exercise Report—Two New Records: 300 Normal Crunches; 10+6 Chin Ups+Pull Ups

Practiced squash today at the prep school courts of the club I just joined. Such an exhausting sport. I love it. What a workout. Too tired to look at local fireworks.

Last night at the gym late—done at 9pm. Two new personal bests: 300 crunches (3 sets of 100 each) with the exercise ball (not the bicycle-type crunches, which are much harder) and 10 chin ups followed by 6 pull ups (increased from 10 + 4 1/2). On June 16 I was at 135 crunches with the exercise ball. That’s progress to me. I am loving the chinning bar. I want to move along it like a ninja.

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New Tennis Tactic: Tick Attack!

Another tick bite. Damn. This time playing tennis. Or at least I think from walking to the tennis court and brushing some overgrown shrubs on the path. Damn. Sometimes years go by without a bite. But I only get them when I am in the woods or crawling through tall grasses on my stomach. Here I just go for a stroll to the court to practice. And it’s only been three weeks since I stopped taking the doxycycline pills to ward off Lyme disease from the last tick that kissed me and sucked me like a mini-vampire.

Is this some new strategy my opponents have initiated to beat me even worse than before? I am back on the pill.

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Can You Change Personalities And Become A Killer On The Court?

In the game on July 1st, when the other team was behind, one of my opponents told his partner to “Play for blood!” And that partner would then really get miffed with his own teammate when a point was lost: “Why didn’t you move back to the center? How could you miss that shot?” he would ask with annoyance.

I also noticed that after a point, when the first guy fed me a ball, so that I could serve, he hit it back to me low, hard, and with lots of top spin. I usually just lob the ball over in a gentle way when I feed the server.

I think of myself as an easy-going type. Though competitive, I can’t usually forget serious problems in the world or the troubles people I know are dealing with. So I don’t get upset if I lose. I mean it’s just a game, and we are out there to have fun. If my partner screws up or double faults, big deal. My main goal is for me to play well. I may become disappointed when I hit long or in the net. I may feel apologetic that I am letting my partner down or not giving the other guys a better game. But I don’t get angry.

Now I’d also heard for years that if you watch someone playing almost any sport, you can see their personality in action. If they cheat in the game, they probably do it in business. I am gentle, so I lob the ball back easily. Someone else is tough, he fires it back with vigor. But I also want to hit a hard, fast tennis ball in the game, so of course I should do it in practice and now maybe at all times on the court. I want to be tougher, rougher, gruffer and meaner in “play” than I am in real life. In fact:

I WANT TO BE A KILLER! I AM OUT FOR BLOOD!! I WILL NOT TAKE ANY PRISONERS!!!!! Read the rest of this entry »

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Marc Sokolik: “Like The Energizer Bunny, I Just Keep Throwing The Shot”

Marc Sokolik of St. Louis, Missouri has thrived on sports his whole life:

I STARTED THROWING THE SHOT PUT AT NAUTILUS JR HIGH (MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA), BUT IN HIGH SCHOOL AT 5’6″ AND 160 LBS, I WAS TOLD I WAS TOO SMALL TO THROW THE SHOT.

Marc Sokolik gives his all as he puts the shot—5/08

Marc Sokolik gives his all as he puts the shot—5/08

I HAVE STAYED INVOLVED IN SPORTS AND FITNESS THROUGHOUT MY LIFE. IN MY THIRTIES I PLAYED IN AN UNDER-SIX-FOOT BASKETBALL LEAGUE UNTIL I WAS 40 AND ALSO PLAYED QUARTERBACK IN A MEN’S FLAG FOOTBALL LEAGUE UNTIL I WAS 36.

ALL THE WHILE FOR RECREATION I HAVE GONE IN THE BACKYARD AND THROWN THE SHOT PUT JUST FOR FUN AND THE CHALLENGE OF SEEING HOW FAR I COULD THROW IT.

IN THE EARLY NINETIES WHEN I TURNED 50, ST. LOUIS CREATED A SENIOR OLYMPICS (NOT SURE WHAT YEAR), AND I STARTED THROWING THE SHOT COMPETITIVELY ALONG WITH THE OTHER EVENTS, AND I HAVE JUST KEPT DOING IT. I DO NOT COMPETE AGAINST THE OTHERS, AS THEY ARE ALL BIGGER THAN ME STILL, BUT AS THEY DIE, BECOME UNABLE TO COMPETE OR JUST DROP OUT, LIKE THE ENERGIZER BUNNY, I JUST KEEP THROWING… AND BY THE TIME I AM 80 GOD WILLING, I SHOULD BE ABLE TO BE THE ONLY ENTRANT AND GET A GOLD MEDAL.

I DO WORK OUT DAILY DOING CARDIOVASCULAR AS A PART OF MY ROUTINE, AND THEN I MIX IN SMALL TO MEDIUM WEIGHTS FOR MUSCLE TONE AND STRENGTH OF WHICH I HAVE NEITHER.

I HAVE ATTACHED SOME PICTURES FR0M BOTH THE ARIZONA AND ST. LOUIS SENIOR OLYMPICS. IN BOTH OF THESE I WAS LUCKY ENOUGH TO SCORE BRONZE MEDALS WITH THROWS FOR 30-32′ TAKE CARE AND THANKS FOR YOUR INTEREST.

Marc Sokolik (rt) takes the Bronze medal at the 2005 Arizona Senior Olympics

Marc Sokolik (rt) takes the Bronze medal at the 2005 Arizona Senior Olympics

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18 Reasons Why Riding A Horse IS Better Than Sex

A horse-farm owner named Fiona L”Estrange, who is also an FEI dressage rider and also teaches and trains sent me this explanation of why she has spent much of her life riding horses. She has also promised to send some pictures of her abs if enough readers urge her on!

18- You don’t have to sneak your riding magazines into
the house.

17- If you are having trouble with riding, it’s
perfectly acceptable to pay a professional to show you
how to improve your technique.

16- The Ten Commandments don’t say anything about
riding.

15- If your trainer takes pictures or videotapes of
you riding, you don’t have to worry about them showing
up on the Internet when you become famous.

14- Your horse won’t keep asking questions about other
horses you’ve ridden.

13- It’s perfectly respectable to ride a horse you’ve
never met before, just once, or, ride many horses in
the same day, whether you know them or not. Read the rest of this entry »

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Why Americans Have More Heart Attacks

After an exhaustive review of the research literature, here’s the final word
on nutrition and health:

1. Japanese eat very little fat and suffer fewer heart attacks than us.
2. Mexicans eat a lot of fat and suffer fewer heart attacks than us.
3. Chinese drink very little red wine and suffer fewer heart attacks than us.
4. Italians drink excessive amounts of red wine and suffer fewer heart attacks than us.
5. Germans drink beer and eat lots of sausages and fats and suffer fewer heart attacks than us.

CONCLUSION: Eat and drink what you like. Speaking English is apparently what kills you.

But don’t worry, your Government is trying to correct this problem.

David Dougherty Is A Passionate Athlete Biking Furiously These Days

David Dougherty says that he is a very “kinetic” person who has been active in sports all his life. He needs athletics as a balance to his business and family life and thinks nothing of playing tennis in four different games on a weekend. Or playing tennis in the morning and a round of golf in the afternoon. He also sails at a nearby lake and in Newport, RI when he can. Winters are filled with snowboarding and very aggressive ping-pong contests.

Most mornings these days he heads to his local Connecticut gym, where he cycles for an hour or two on a stationary bike that has a program hooked up to an online internet account. This way he can change his virtual course and also document how many miles he “rides” and how many calories he burns over a documented number of hours.

David Dougherty Cycling the Miles

David Dougherty Cycling the Miles

At age 53, he is now on a real flurry, pedaling as much as 32.5 miles in two hours some days, which always begin around 6:30 am. Over the last four months he has ridden 864 miles, burned over 40,000 calories, and expects to pass the 1250-mile marker this month. He is proud of his slimming-down, muscling up and has the heart of a lion.

David Dougherty Pedaling Furiously Fast

David Dougherty Pedaling Furiously Fast

Now here is what he wrote to me:

“In leadership training school, I learned the principle that “you do physical training to make your body as vital as possible.” This included working out, diet, rest, etc. I have been working out 3-5 days a week, 45 -120 minutes a day for 30 years. So what may seem excessive to you has been a life style and a leadership culture I grew up in.

The only time I have really gotten away from this is in the last several years, because of my business travel…..you and I come from somewhat different planets and norms….I am amazed that you can stay in such good shape and not work out much….good genes….it takes a ton of work now …..more work to stay in worse shape…..”

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