Fanatical…that’s what I have become. Playing tennis 25 days in the last 31 (or 16 out of 17 or 20 out of 24), reading tennis strategy books at night, watching tennis videos, practicing new serves (spin and kick), new ground strokes, new placements. I can’t get enough. Sometimes my game improves. Other times I can’t execute the new shots. But overall I am becoming better…just frustrated that there is still no consistency. At least when I play in the tougher competitions, my team no longer loses consistently. And my net game remains strong.

Of course I was glued to the TV during Wimbledon. And off today to Newport to watch the Campbell’s Cup ATP matches there, with Isner, Nishikori, Raonic and the Bryan Brothers playing.

In addition to all this, I have been working on new projects and handling my usual business and personal responsibilities. So no wonder I haven’t written much for this site. I miss those quiet moments of reflection and sharing.

My friend Joe is passionate about theater (he runs one), and no matter how tired he is, he always says that he is grateful to have such zest and zeal for the stage. Having a major interest that drives you incessantly isn’t something you can tack on to your life. It often takes over your life. It is a gift of sorts. There is no boredom, no wondering what you are going to do today, no feeling of “been there, done that.” There are many activities that no longer interest me, whether it is jumping out of planes, eating often in fine restaurants, shopping for wines and cheeses, attending black tie parties (those never did). But I am out of control, when it comes to hitting tennis balls. I love the challenge, the sweating, the cardio, the feel of a well-placed shot, or just hitting dozens of overheads—or mis-hitting them—launched by a ball machine. I love the tiredness, when the day’s playing is over.

I am very lucky to have found this sport, to be so passionate about it, however late in life. While I am so out of control, I will play as long as I can. And should my enthusiasm burn out, or I feel too many aches, or I am no longer able to play, well then it’s been a helluva ride.

At a business lunch this week, I heard two stories about two unrelated women who suddenly had headaches, went to the emergency room, and immediately needed surgery for inexplicable brain infections. Bacteria that are normal in the intestines had migrated to their brains and created life-threatening pain and injury. Both survived, although one took three years to recover her motor skills. Both had been healthy. This is the reality of being a human. Sure there are bombs and car accidents and burglars and hurricanes that can all damage or extinguish our existence. But there are also tiny organisms inside of us that can paralyze us and take away our good health without any warning or explanation. So if good health is this fragile, if life can be this fleeting, how can we not savor it, enjoy it, live it to the fullest when we are able? Have a great day!